SHARING CURRENT PRACTICE


We know that there are a number of educators who have developed some interesting on-the-ground responses to the questions related to Hebrew learning in supplementary schools. This is the place to share! We are most interested in formats you are using, times you are meeting, involvement of parents (or others), and curriculum design ... with (if possible) some explanation of connection to your goals for Hebrew education. This is not the place to post specific lesson plans, games, worksheets, or similar items.

On this page we'd like to explore what works (or might work). Note that the question is specific to congregations, with all the challenges related to students, teachers and milieu inherent in this educational setting.

We invite signed-in participants to respond to this question by uploading directly onto this page short papers, articles, "blog-type-statements" (Click EDIT on the top right of the page, and then in the EDITOR TOOL BAR click on the "colored landscape picture" - it will allow you to upload documents from your computer). You may also link articles or other webpages by clicking on the LINK picture in the EDITOR TOOL BAR.

We also invite signed-in participants to discuss the postings and more informal ideas by clicking on the DISCUSSION tab at the top of this page. You may start a new thread or respond to a posted one.

Finally, participants may wish to enable the NOTIFY ME feature (also on a tab at the top of this page) so that you can immediately learn of any new updates to this page.

When you post, include a TITLE for your upload, as well as YOUR NAME:

"Tutoring Trends Test Jewish Values," The Jewish Week, December 22, 2009

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posted 1/26/10 by Nachama Skolnik Moskowitz
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Teaching Hebrew in Supplementary Schools in the UK - I had the pleasure of spending a week with the Department of Jewish Education (DJE) of the Leo Baeck College in the UK. Jo-Ann Myers, Head of the DJE, has been working on a Hebrew program for young children (starting in kindergarten) that introduces a cultural vocabulary with units on subjects like: Family, Shabbat, Toys, and Animals. It is from the 7-13 words per unit that Hebrew reading emerges via a combination of whole word and phonetics. Jo-An reports that each unit takes about a semester in a supplementary setting. I have a video of Jo-Ann explaining this program and sharing the support materials ... but it's too large of a file to upload to a wikispace. I'll keep working on the upload issue, but I the idea of learning to read from words students already know certainly is an idea worth us considering. Too much bah-bah-beh and teeth-breaking docoding are part of our practice! (Nachama S. Moskowitz; posted 2/20/10)
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Vital Signs: Putting the School into Hebrew School, by Dr. Jack Wertheimer (February 22, 2010)
http://www.jewishideasdaily.com/content/detail/continue-reading-vital-signs-putting-the-school-into-hebrew-school
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What can Schools and Synagogues Learn from the Successes of Tefilah Education at Camp? by Rabbi Sarah Graff. April 30, 2013 posted.
http://ejewishphilanthropy.com/what-can-schools-and-synagogues-learn-from-the-successes-of-tefilah-education-at-camp/?utm_source=Tue+Apr+30&utm_campaign=Tues+Apr+30&utm_medium=email